The math game that beat Angry Birds: DragonBox makes it fun to solve complex equations

(E3 Los Angeles/Oslo -June 7, 2012) - A revolutionary math game has kids getting a kick out of algebra--and they don't even know it. DragonBox, the first release from game-based learning startup WeWantToKnow, has proven so popular in its home country of Norway that it became the top-selling app within a week of its trial launch.

What's the secret? DragonBox does away with tedious equations and math quizzes, replacing them instead with a simple game involving cards and a magical box. The game evolves as kids master the skills and concepts presented. After one hour of playing DragonBox, twelve-year olds can tackle equations their parents struggle to solve.

More popular than Angry Birds in Norway

DragonBox was pre-launched in Norway to let schools, kids and parents test the game. Almost immediately, it rocketed to become the most purchased app in Apple's App Store in Norway, kicking more traditional games out of the top list. More than 10% of all iPad users in Norway downloaded and bought DragonBox within the first few weeks.

"Our aim has been to make a game that is as fun as 'Angry Birds', as fascinating as 'Cut the Rope', and as addictive as 'Temple Run', says Jean Baptiste Huyhn, Co-founder and CEO of WeWantToKnow. "As they're playing, they begin to understand the simple concepts that underlie all equations. Having tested this with several hundred kids in the age of six to 18, this method has proved to work.  After one hour of playing the game, more than 30 % were able to solve equations, and after two hours of playing the game between 60 and 80 % were able to solve equations.”

 Mr. Huyhn continues: "I worked as math teacher for several years, and have seen how many young kids struggle with math. It's easy for students to lose motivation and give up. They become convinced that math is too difficult for them. With DragonBox we want to change that and help kids believe in themselves and their own abilities."

After nine months in development, the first version of the game was tested at Li Junior High School in Norway. "We have tested DragonBox in our school and have experienced some serious positive results.  We believe that DragonBox and other games built upon the concept of game-based learning will have a huge potential in schools and education. The key to success is to be able to integrate these games into the daily life of education," says Linda Tomtsveen , teacher at Li Junior High School.

DragonBox is designed for iPads and Adroid tablets, but also works well on iPhones and Android phones. A special version is available for Mac computers. DragonBox costs $5.99 for the tablet version and $2.99 for the phone version. Download it from the App Store or Google Play.  


Games PressGames Press is the leading online resource for games journalists. Used daily by magazines, newspapers, TV, radio, online media and retailers worldwide, it offers a vast, constantly updated archive of press releases and assets, and is the simplest and most cost-effective way for PR professionals to reach the widest possible audience. Registration for the site and the Games Press email digest is available, to the trade only, at www.gamespress.com.