Nintendo boss heaps more pressure on Activision Blizzard CEO in the wake of WSJ report

After last week’s criticisms aimed at Bobby Kotick’s leadership from PlayStation and Xbox bosses, Nintendo of America president Doug Bowser has added his voice to the near-universal condemnation surrounding charges of workplace toxicity, inequality and harassment that appear to have been endemic at Activision Blizzard (via Fanbyte).

In yet another leaked internal memo in the wake of the Wall Street Journal’s report claiming that Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick was aware of longstanding allegations of sexual misconduct towards employees within the organisation, Bowser said that Nintendo representatives “have taken action and are assessing others” in an effort to ensure that “every company in the industry… create an environment where everyone is respected and treated as equals, and where all understand the consequences of not doing so.

“Along with all of you, I’ve been following the latest developments with Activision Blizzard and the ongoing reports of sexual harassment and toxicity at the company,” Bowser wrote. “I find these accounts distressing and disturbing. They run counter to my values as well as Nintendo’s beliefs, values and policies.”

Bowser’s comments, first reported by Fanbyte and since confirmed by Nintendo, complete a full broadside from gaming’s console platform holders. Meanwhile, the number of Activision Blizzard employees that have publicly called on Kotick to resign continues to rise as the under siege CEO considers his next move.

About Richie Shoemaker

Prior to taking the editorial helm of MCV/DEVELOP Richie spent 20 years shovelling word-coal into the engines of numerous gaming magazines and websites, many of which are now lost beneath the churning waves of progress. If not already obvious, he is partial to the odd nautical metaphor.

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