United Games Entertainment secures the rights to an unreleased SEGA / Westone game

Strictly Limited Games and ININ Games (both labels of United Games Entertainment) have announced that they have secured the rights to SEGA/Westone’s previously unreleased arcade title Clockwork Aquario. The game’s release date is planned for late 2020, with various physical and digital editions being distributed worldwide by Strictly Limited Games and ININ Games, respectively.

Clockwork Aquario, which was the last arcade game ever developed by Westone, goes back to 1992 (when I was two, I hope this makes you feel old). The game’s development was cancelled due to the overwhelming popularity of fighting games and 3D titles at the time.

Westone is known for being the company that invented the Wonder Boy IP, one of Sega’s mascot games alongside Alex Kidd, before being replaced by the usurper, Sonic the Hedgehog.

Strictly Unlimited Games discovered the game’s whereabouts three years ago, and set to bringing the title back to life.

“It’s part of the mission of our label Strictly Limited Games to unearth gems like Sega/Westone’s Clockwork Aquario or DICE’s Ultracore that are an essential part of the video game culture and history” said the company in a statement. “With a lot of hard work and the commitment of everyone involved – including numerous members of the original Westone team that developed Clockwork Aquario 27 years ago – the game could finally be restored.”

Strictly Limited joined forces with ININ Games, who will be handling the game’s digital distribution. More information will be available on the Clockwork Aquario website 

 

About Chris Wallace

Chris is MCV/DEVELOP's staff writer, joining the team after graduating from Cardiff University with a Master's degree in Magazine Journalism. He can regrettably be found on Twitter at @wallacec42, where he mostly explores his obsession with the Life is Strange series, for which he refuses to apologise.

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