Euclideon re-emerges with yet more stunning videos of its tech

'Euclideon makes world's most realistic graphics' boasts the headline on the Aussie company's site accompanying its latest video
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The first video (two have gone live following some two years of silence from the ambitious tech company from Brisbane) shows of some truly stunning scans of real-world locations, pulling the ol' switcheroo mid-way through the second video to reveal that what it had been touting as footage of the read world was actually their rendering software all along.

The software which enables such high detail representations of real-world locations to work is a combination of Solidscan and Unlimited Detail. The way it works is that Solidscan enhances the detail of laser-scanned real-world locations and Unlimited Detail runs a search, but only once for each pixel required to be on screen. This allows what Euclideon claims on its web site to be 'interactive frame-rates', without the requirement for high-end CPUs of graphics cards.

In fact, Euclideon is boasting that the data itself will a mere five-to-20 per cent of its original size, that load times will be less than a second regardless of the amount of data being stored, and that it will run on low-end laptops.

Lofty promises indeed, but Euclideon hasn't been without its detractors, having garnered significant criticism along the way from people who saw its vision as unrealistic, as well as suffering some redundancies last June.

"A lot of professionals on the internet said that our claims were impossible... but they were wrong," says a boisterous Bruce Dells, CEO of Euclideon in one of the newly released videos before going on to brag that the company's technology is currently being used by some of the biggest companies in the world.

If the trepidation from outside is having any impact on Dells' vision, he certainly isn't showing it.

Much of the viable applications for the detail-laden real-world scans seems to be in map-making and the preservation of historical landmarks, but Dells also claims that the software's application for video games is very real.

He directly addresses that yes, it will work for games, that yes, Euclideon is working on two such titles right now, that yes, they can do animations, and that yes, said animations are 'very good', although no further details have been promised until the team releases its next video.

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