Report: Unity boss says VR/AR development is for those in for the long haul

PCGamesN's Julian Benson spoke Toni Parisi who said that getting in to VR was not a choice for an "economic argument"
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PCGamesN's Julian Benson spoke Toni Parisi who said that getting in to VR was not a choice for an "economic argument"
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Speaking with Julian Benson of the games website PCGamesN, Unity's head of VR and AR, Tony Parisi, has said that getting in to VR development was going for the long haul and that it is not an economic solution for developers.

In the interveiw, Benson asked Parisi if he could recommoend entering VR development given the current sales figures for VR devices. Parisi replied: "You should be able to make a VR game if that’s what you want to do. Going with the evolution of the industry, any one of us could say ‘Jump in – there’s a gold mine here’, but we’re still in the place where we’re climbing up that mountain.

“If I could recommend anybody to make a game in VR I’d do it on the basis of getting into this field. Not on an economic argument. We believe in the long haul, we don’t know how long it’s going to take, we believe in the long-term success of this technology."

Recent sales figures for virtual reality headsets are varied with the PlayStation VR from Sony having sold just under 1 million units according to figures released in February 2017, and HTC Vive and Oculus Rift have both sold under 500,000 units. The most popular device is the Samsung Gear VR with over 4 million sales.

Parisi is keen to point out that this technology is new and that can affect the userbase for any hardware. Although industry commentators also believe the lack of a big name release or app on the platforms is stopping mass public interest in the mediums.

Thanks to PCGamesN.

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