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Giselle Stewart to lead reformed studio; Permanent replacement sought

Edmondson quits Ubisoft Reflections

Gareth Edmondson has departed from Ubisoft Reflections as its studio manager after more than ten years at the company.

Edmondson “has made the choice to leave the studio”, Ubisoft has told Develop, though further details are not clear.

The last project with him at the helm was the critically acclaimed Driver: San Francisco.

Develop understands that Edmondson, who’s brother Martin founded Reflections in 1984, will remain in the games business in some capacity.



Giselle Stewart, formerly general manager, will now head the studio along with production director Darren Yeomans until a permanent replacement is found.

“In the five years since Reflections has become a part of the Ubisoft team of studios, we have had the pleasure of working and creating together with Gareth Edmondson as head,” a spokesperson for Ubisoft said.

“Gareth has made the choice to leave the studio at this time. Our team of talented developers at Reflections will continue their work on upcoming projects under the supervision of Giselle Stewart, Studio Manager, and Darren Yeomans, Production Director, until a permanent replacement has been named."

The surprise resignation comes after brother Martin returned to the studio for the development of Driver: San Francisco, which exceeded sales expectations and garnered an average rating of 80 on Metacritic.

Last year it was rumoured the studio was to cut 19 staff as part of wider restructuring at Ubisoft, whilst in 2004 studio manager Martin quit the developer and sued then owners Atari for unfair dismissal, paving the way for brother Gareth to take over the role.

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