Home / Business / King’s Candy Crush Soda Saga exceeds $2 billion in lifetime revenue

King’s Candy Crush Soda Saga exceeds $2 billion in lifetime revenue

Candy Crush Soda Saga has grossed more than $2 billion in lifetime revenue.

According to a report by analysts Sensor Tower Store Intelligence, King’s match-3 blockbuster has amassed 410m first-time installs since it released in 2014, across both the App Store and Google Play. It’s most popular in India and the U.S., the latter of which generated over half that revenue alone.

A similar theme arises when the analysts looked at download share, too. Whilst the US also led in downloads – 68 million, or 17 per cent – India clocked up 12 per cent of all downloads with 50 million.

“King’s pop-themed match-three—the second oldest title in its sugary Candy Crush series—is especially popular in America, having accumulated $1.1 billion (55 per cent) of its revenue in the U.S. alone,” Sensor Tower said. “For comparison, Great Britain, which came in second place for player spending, has contributed $135 million, or just under 7 per cent, of Soda Saga’s lifetime revenue.”

Across its full portfolio, King grossed more than $450m (£348.8m) last quarter, Q3 2019, with $85m – 19 per cent of all revenue – generated from Candy Crush Soda Saga alone. All four Candy Crush titles made up 85 per cent of the developer’s revenue at $258m combined. 

“Potential competitors in the puzzle genre should keep an eye on King’s games and especially the Saga series, as – despite their age – they continue to be the champions of their genre when it comes to revenue,” the analysts said.

Interestingly, Dragon Ball Z: Dokkan Battle has also recently hit $2 billion revenue since its launch in 2015, too. However, it’s Japanese users that make up the game’s biggest spenders, accounting for $1.2 billion of the game’s total lifetime revenue while the U.S. was the second highest-grossing country, generating $452 million, or 22 per cent. French players are the third biggest spenders, accounting for $112 million, or 6 per cent of all revenue.

About Vikki Blake

It took 15 years of civil service monotony for Vikki to crack and switch to writing about games. She has since become an experienced reporter and critic working with a number of specialist and mainstream outlets in both the UK and beyond.

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