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Channel 4 commissioning editor for education will move over to run UK games trade association in January

Twist to become UKIE CEO

Dr Jo Twist has been today named as the CEO of games trade association UKIE.

Twist is currently commissioning editor for education at UK broadcaster Channel 4 and will take her new role from January 9th.

Twist has a ‘strong background in education, creative technology and youth culture’ and ‘a wealth of experience in all aspects of interactive entertainment including media, technical innovation and creativity, commercial and political issues’, the organisation said this morning.

Twist has been a major part of Channel 4’s proactive push into commissioning non-TV educational content, which include a portfolio of games including sex-education shooter Privates, The Curfew and Bow Street Runners.

Previously, Twist was multiplatform commissioner for BBC Entertainment and Switch, plus BBC Three’s multiplatform channel editor.

UKIE’s filling the CEO post follows months of interviews and research by the trade association. UKIE board members were keen to find a new exec befitting of its rebrand; the organisation changed its name from ELSPA in August 2010 and widened its remit beyond traditional PC & console games publishers to include developers, educators and technology firms.

Twist said: “It’s an honour and a privilege to join the brilliant UKIE team at a time when the British interactive entertainment industry is forging its path as a global leader.

“UKIE has already achieved so much in bringing the potential of our games industry to the national debate, and I am hugely excited to represent its members and help shape its vision for 2012 and on.

“I will of course be sad to be leaving the Channel 4 Education team who continue to produce award winning and innovative interactive content for young people.”

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